Browsing posts in: dnx

Running a C# REPL in a DNX application with scriptcs

One of the cool things that scriptcs allows you to do, is that you can embed it into your application and allow execution of C# scripts. There are even some great resources on that out there, like this awesome post by Mads.

The same applies to the REPL functionality – you don’t have to use scriptcs.exe to access the REPL – you can use the scriptcs Nuget packages to create a REPL inside your app.

And because there aren’t that many resources (if any) on how to host a scriptcs REPL, today I wanted to show you just that. But for a more interesting twist, we’ll do that inside a DNX application.

There are many reasons why DNX is awesome, and why you’d want to use it, but especially because, through the project.json project system, it has a much improved way of referencing and loading dependencies and Nuget packages – and we can leverage that mechanism to feed assemblies into our REPL.

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Hacking DNX to run C# scripts

Because of my considerable community involvement in promoting C# scripting (i.e. here or here), I thought the other day, why not attempt to run C# scripts using DNX?

While out of the box, DNX only compiles proper, traditional C# only, thanks to the compilation hooks it exposes, it is possible to intercept the compilation object prior to it being actually emitted, which allows you to do just about anything – including run C# scripts.

Let’s explore more.

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Integration testing ASP.NET 5 and ASP.NET MVC 6 applications

The other day I ran into a post by Alex Zeitler, who blogged about integration testing of ASP.NET MVC 6 controllers. Alex has done some great work for the Web API community in the past and I always enjoy his posts.

In this case, Alex suggested using self hosting for that, so spinning up a server and hitting it over HTTP and then shutting down, as part of each test case. Some people have done that in the past with Web API too, but is not an approach I agree with when doing integration testing. If you follow this blog you might have seen my post about testing OWIN apps and Web API apps in memory already.

My main issue with the self-host approach, is that you and up testing the underlying operating system networking stack, the so-called “wire” which is not necessarily something you want to test – given that it will be different anyway in production (especially if you intend to run on IIS). On the other hand, you want to be able to run end-to-end tests quickly anywhere – developer’s machine, integration server or any other place that it might be necessary, and doing it entirely in memory is a great approach.

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