Browsing posts in: asp.net core

Beautiful and compact Web APIs with C# 9, .NET 5.0 and ASP.NET Core

Almost fours year ago I blogged about building lightweight microservices with ASP.NET Core 1.2 (which actually never shipped in such version and later became ASP.NET Core 2.0). The idea there was to drop the notion of bloated MVC controllers, get rid of as much as we can of the usual verbosity of C# based applications, and use a set of simple extension methods and a few cutting edge features of ASP.NET Core to provide a node.js style experience for authoring Web APIs.

The article and the accompanying demo projects received quite a lot of attention, and I even got a chance to speak at some conference about these type of approaches to building focused, small microservices. With the .NET 5.0 in sight (.NET 5.0 RC2 is out at the time of writing this), and some remarkable features of C# 9, this “lightweight Web APIs” concept deserves a revisit, and this is what we will do in this blog post.

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ASP.NET Core MVC 3.x – AddMvc(), AddMvcCore(), AddControllers() and other bootstrapping approaches

There are several ways of bootstrapping your MVC applications on top of ASP.NET Core 3.x. One thing that you need to do, in order to use the framework, is to initialize it into the state where it can actually discover your controllers, views, pages and expose them as HTTP endpoints.

I've recently had some conversations with folks about that, and it occurred to me that this is not necessarily all that obvious to everyone. That's because there are a few ways of doing that, so let's quickly run through them.

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Dynamic controller routing in ASP.NET Core 3.0

One of the great extensibility points in the routing feature of the older versions of the ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Core MVC frameworks was the ability to pick up any route and dynamically point it at a given controller/action.

This had a lot of excellent use cases – as we will briefly see – and since ASP.NET Core 3.0 Preview 7, the feature is actually finally available in ASP.NET Core 3.0 (despite not being mentioned in the official release blog post).

So, let’s have a look at dynamic routing in ASP.NET Core 3.0 together!

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Elegant way of producing HTTP responses in ASP.NET Core outside of MVC controllers

ASP.NET Core 2.1 introduced support for a little (or, should I say, not at all) documented feature called IActionResultExecutor<T>. It allows us to use some of the action results -those that we are used to from MVC controllers – outside of the controller context, so for example from a middleware component.

Kristian has a great blog post about result executors, that I recommend you check out. From my side, I wanted to show you today a set of extension methods that were recently introduced into WebApiContrib.Core that make working with IActionResultExecutor<T> and in general authoring HTTP endpoints outside of controllers even easier.

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Be careful when manually handling JSON requests in ASP.NET Core

The other day I was reviewing some code in an ASP.NET Core app. It was an HTTP endpoint, written as a simple, lightweight middleware component (so no MVC), that was handling incoming JSON requests.

The endpoint was intended to act as an ingestion point for larger amounts of data, so by definition it was supposed to perform well. I immediately noticed a few things that raised my eyebrow, that I wanted to share with you today.

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Convert null-valued results to 404 in ASP.NET Core MVC

ASP.NET Core MVC is pretty flexible in terms of how it expects you to return results from the API actions. You could return an IActionResult, which gives you certain control over the status code and the nature of the response (i.e. object or a file or a status code only and so on). You could return a concrete object instance, and the framework will serialize it to the relevant response format. Finally, you could also return the new ActionResult<T> which allows you to mix both of the previous approaches in a single method, giving you the best of both worlds.

Let’s have a look at what happens in the framework when you return a null object instance and how you can change that behavior.

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Running ASP.NET Core content negotiation by hand

When you are building flexible HTTP APIs, supporting a wide array of different clients, it is common to rely on the process of content negotiation, to allow each client to interact with the API in the most convenient way – be it JSON, XML, Protobuf, Messagepack or any other media type on which both the client and the server can agree.

I have blogged about content negotiation (or in short: conneg) a few times in the past (for example here or here, in ASP.NET Core context). Today I’d like to show you how – in ASP.NET Core – to easily run conneg by hand, instead of relying on the built-in MVC conneg mechanisms.

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Azure Blob Storage IFileProvider for ASP.NET Core

As part of my recent talks on ASP.NET core, I have been showing how to build a custom IFileProvider for ASP.NET Core. The example that I was using was Azure Blob Storage – and exposing files from there as if they were local files that are part of your application.

I have pushed that code to Github and decided to package it as Nuget package, which, hopefully, someone will find useful.

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Centralized exception handling and request validation in ASP.NET Core

One of the most common things that I have seen developers working with ASP.NET Core struggle with, is the way to centrally and consistently handle application errors and input validation. Those seemingly different topics are really two sides of the same coin.

More often than not, exceptions are just allowed to bubble all the way up and left unhandled, leaving the framework the responsibility to convert them to a generic 500 errors. In many other situations, exception handling is fragmented and happens in certain individual controllers only. With regard to input validation, we often have completely customized ways of notifying the client about input issues or – at best – we leave everything to the framework and let it work its defaults via the ModelState functionality.

What I wanted to show you today is how you can introduce a consistent, centralized way of handling exceptions and request validation in an ASP.NET Core web application.

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