Browsing posts in: asp.net mvc

Centralized exception handling and request validation in ASP.NET Core

One of the most common things that I have seen developers working with ASP.NET Core struggle with, is the way to centrally and consistently handle application errors and input validation. Those seemingly different topics are really two sides of the same coin.

More often than not, exceptions are just allowed to bubble all the way up and left unhandled, leaving the framework the responsibility to convert them to a generic 500 errors. In many other situations, exception handling is fragmented and happens in certain individual controllers only. With regard to input validation, we often have completely customized ways of notifying the client about input issues or – at best – we leave everything to the framework and let it work its defaults via the ModelState functionality.

What I wanted to show you today is how you can introduce a consistent, centralized way of handling exceptions and request validation in an ASP.NET Core web application.

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[Required] and [BindRequired] in ASP.NET Core MVC

When controlling the binding behavior of models in ASP.NET Core MVC applications, it is very common to perform some validation on them. For that, data annotations are a perfect tool.

One of the most typical use cases of data annotations is to ensure that a value of a certain property has been provided by the caller of the API – and this, historically (in “classic” ASP.NET MVC), has been controlled by RequiredAttribute. The attribute can still be used in ASP.NET Core MVC, but there is also a new one – BindRequiredAttribute.

Let’s have a look at the subtle differences between them.

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Customizing query string parameter binding in ASP.NET Core MVC

A few years ago I blogged about binding parameters from URI in ASP.NET Web API. One of the examples in that post was how to bind a comma-separated collection passed to your API as a query string parameter.

Technologies change, and we now work with ASP.NET Core (and the MVC Core framework), but problems remain the same – so let’s have a look at how we can customize the way parameters are bound from query string in ASP.NET Core MVC.

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Using IActionConstraints in ASP.NET Core MVC

ASP.NET Core provides a way to constraint parameter values when matching routes via an IRouteConstraint (read more here) interface. This can be very useful, if you want to disambiguate certain routes from one another. This functionality is built into the routing package and is independent from the MVC framework.

However, aside from that, the MVC framework itself also provides an interesting constraint-mechanism – IActionConstraints. Let’s have a look at them today.

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Running multiple independent ASP.NET Core pipelines side by side in the same application

The other day I started looking into a problem of being able to run several independent ASP.NET Core pipelines from within the same main application, running on top of the same Kestrel server. This was actually asked on MVC Github repo but closed without a real answer.

Let’s have a detailed look at the problem, and (one) possible solution to it.

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[Controller] and [NonController] attributes in ASP.NET Core MVC

One of the late additions before the RTM release of ASP.NET Core MVC was the introduction of the [Controller] attribute, and its counterpart, [NonController], which were added in RC2.

Together, they allow you to more specifically control which classes should be considered by the framework to be controllers (or controller candidates) and which shouldn’t. They also help you avoid the nasty hacks we needed to do in i.e. ASP.NET Web API to opt out from the “Controller” suffix in the name.

Let’s have a look.

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Customizing FormatFilter behavior in ASP.NET Core MVC 1.0

When you are building HTTP APIs with ASP.NET Core MVC, the framework allows you to use FormatFilter to let the calling client override any content negotiation that might have happened on the server side.

This way, the client can – for example – force the return data to be JSON or CSV or any other format suitable (as long as the server supports it, of course) for his consumption.

The built-in mechanism (out of the box version of FormatFilter) is a little limited, so let’s have a look at how you can extend and customize its behavior.

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Predefined Namespaces And Custom Base View Page in ASP.NET Core 1.0 MVC

It is quite common to predefine some namespaces to be available in the context of your Razor view files in ASP.NET MVC. In MVC 5, it was done inside the web.config file – not the “main” application one, but the one residing inside your Views folder.

Additionally, the same file was used to define the pageBaseType for your Razor views. This way you could expose extra members or behaviors to your pages, such as injected services or common configuration objects.

Since there is no more web.config in ASP.NET Core 1.0 MVC, let’s have a look at how to achieve the same in the next generation ASP.NET.

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ASP.NET MVC 6 formatters – XML and browser requests

A while ago I wrote a post about formatters in MVC 6.

Since then, there have been some changes regarding XML handling and an interesting feature that was added recently that was not part of that post, so I think it warranties a follow up. XML formatter is now removed by default. On top of that, MVC 6 will attempt to sniff out whether your request is originating from a browser’s address bar and adjust content negotiation accordingly.

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