Browsing posts in: c#

Resolving ASP.NET Core Startup class from the DI container

In ASP.NET Core, the most common setup is characterized by having a standalone Startup class, responsible for bootstrapping the services needed by your application, as well as setting up the application pipeline.

What most users of ASP.NET Core do not realize, is that at runtime, the Startup instance is actually being resolved from the DI container. This allows you to control some interesting aspects of how your application is bootstrapped, which can be really important i.e. in integration testing scenarios.

Let’s have a look.

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C# code formatting settings in VS Code and OmniSharp

I quite often get or see questions about configuring C# code formatting settings for Visual Studio Code.

OmniSharp (the open source Roslyn-based technology that powers C# language services) in VS Code exposes a rich set of code formatting settings which you can use to tailor and customize your C# experience.

Let’s have a look at how you can use them.

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Writing C# build scripts with FAKE, OmniSharp and VS Code

In this blog post I’d like to show an extremely – in my opinion – productive way of writing build scripts using C#. As a basis, we’ll use the excellent core FAKE library called FakeLib, which is written F# and consume it in C# scripts.

Sure, there are other projects/task runners like Cake or Bau that allow you to write C# build scripts (few more actually out there) but the approach I’d like to show you today, is I think the most productive of all, so bear with me.

More after the jump.

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Announcing ConfigR 1.0

Recently we released version 1.0 of ConfigR – a popular .NET configuration library, that lets you configure your application via C# scripts (CSX).

This is also the last release requiring full .NET 4.5/Mono – the next version of ConfigR is going to be a netstandard.

Here’s a overview of the features that are there in 1.0!

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Lazy async initialization for expiring objects

Today I wanted to share something I found myself using quite a lot recently, and that is not supported out of the box by the .NET framework.

So, as part of the framework, we have Lazy<T>, which provides out of the box support for deferring the creation of a large or resource-intensive objects.

However, what if the object requires async operation to be created, and what if its value expires after some time, and it needs to be recomputed? Let’s have a look at how to solve this.

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Strongly typed configuration in ASP.NET Core without IOptions<T>

There are several great resources on the Internet about using the new Configuration and Options framework of ASP.NET Core – like this comprehensive post by Rick Strahl.

Using strongly typed configuration is without a question a great convenience and productivity boost for the developers; but what I wanted to show you today is how to bind IConfiguration directly to your POCO object – so that you can inject it directly into the dependent classes without wrapping into IOptions.

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Global route prefix in ASP.NET Core MVC (revisited)

A couple of months ago I blogged about adding a feature to ASP.NET Core MVC (or ASP.NET 5 at the time) that will allow you to set central route prefix(es) to your attribute routing mechanism.

That solution was written against beta8 version of ASP.NET Core and since now we are at RC2 – it doesn’t (surprise, surprise) work anymore.

Here is the updated version.

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Introducing Strathweb TypedRouting for ASP.NET MVC Core

One of the side projects I created for Web API a while ago was Strathweb.TypeRouting – a little library built on top of the attribute routing extensibility points, that allowed you to declare Web API routes centrally, in a strongly typed way (as opposed to the built in, anonymous object approach).

Then, some time ago, I blogged about how you would achieve the same thing in ASP.NET Core. A bunch of things have changed since then – the original post was written against beta6 of the framework I believe.

Last week, I set up the code on Github, migrated everything to RC2 and released on NuGet for everyone to use.

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Running multiple ASP.NET Web API pipelines side by side

Over the past 4 years or so, I have worked on many Web API projects, for a lot of different clients, and I thought I have seen almost everything.

Last week I came across an interesting new (well, at least to me) scenario though – with the requirement to run two Web API pipelines side by side, in the same process. Imagine having /api as one Web API “instance”, and then having /dashboard as completely separate one, with it’s own completely custom configuration (such as formatter settings, authentication or exception handling). And all of that running in the same process.

More after the jump.

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