Browsing posts in: .net core

Running multiple independent ASP.NET Core pipelines side by side in the same application

The other day I started looking into a problem of being able to run several independent ASP.NET Core pipelines from within the same main application, running on top of the same Kestrel server. This was actually asked on MVC Github repo but closed without a real answer.

Let’s have a detailed look at the problem, and (one) possible solution to it.

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Disposing resources at the end of ASP.NET Core request

Today, let’s have a look at dealing with disposable objects in ASP.NET Core. Imagine you have an object that you’d like to reuse throughout the duration of the HTTP request, but at the end, it must clean up some of its open resources or handles. This is a common requirement for i.e. file writers, DB connections, other unmanaged resources or external processes – to mention just a few.

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Building microservices with ASP.NET Core (without MVC)

There are several reasons why it makes sense to build super-lightweight HTTP services (or, despite all the baggage the word brings, “microservices”). I do not need to go into all the operational or architectural benefits of such approach to system development, as it has been discussed a lot elsewhere.

It feels natural that when building such HTTP services, it definitely makes sense to keep the footprint of the technology you chose as small as possible, not to mention the size of the codebase you should maintain long term.

In this point I wanted to show a couple of techniques for building very lightweight HTTP services on top ASP.NET Core, without the use of any framework, and with minimal code bloat.

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Accessing HttpContext outside of framework components in ASP.NET Core

When developing web applications with ASP.NET, it is common to end up in situations where you require access to HttpContext. This wouldn’t be anything special, but outside of the context of framework level APIs such as controllers, middleware and so on (which would always give you a way to fetch the current HttpContext), it can be tricky.

While generally speaking, HttpContext could be passed around as a regular dependency to the logical components that require it, that solution is often impractical.

Let’s have a look at how you can get a hold of HttpContext in ASP.NET Core.

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Lazy async initialization for expiring objects

Today I wanted to share something I found myself using quite a lot recently, and that is not supported out of the box by the .NET framework.

So, as part of the framework, we have Lazy<T>, which provides out of the box support for deferring the creation of a large or resource-intensive objects.

However, what if the object requires async operation to be created, and what if its value expires after some time, and it needs to be recomputed? Let’s have a look at how to solve this.

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Introducing C# script runner for .NET Core and .NET CLI

In this post I wanted to share a little project I’ve been working on recently – a .NET CLI and .NET Core based script runner for C# (CSX scripts).

The idea was super simple – I just wanted to be able to author C# scripts using .NET Core, leverage project.json to define the script dependencies and execute scripts cross platfom using .NET CLI – via a dotnet script command.

The project is located here on Github. You can head over and have a look at readme to get started – but, briefly, the key features are listed here.

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Strongly typed configuration in ASP.NET Core without IOptions<T>

There are several great resources on the Internet about using the new Configuration and Options framework of ASP.NET Core – like this comprehensive post by Rick Strahl.

Using strongly typed configuration is without a question a great convenience and productivity boost for the developers; but what I wanted to show you today is how to bind IConfiguration directly to your POCO object – so that you can inject it directly into the dependent classes without wrapping into IOptions.

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[Controller] and [NonController] attributes in ASP.NET Core MVC

One of the late additions before the RTM release of ASP.NET Core MVC was the introduction of the [Controller] attribute, and its counterpart, [NonController], which were added in RC2.

Together, they allow you to more specifically control which classes should be considered by the framework to be controllers (or controller candidates) and which shouldn’t. They also help you avoid the nasty hacks we needed to do in i.e. ASP.NET Web API to opt out from the “Controller” suffix in the name.

Let’s have a look.

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Building a lightweight, controller-less, Markdown-only website in ASP.NET Core

In this blog post let’s have a look at building a lightweight site in ASP.NET Core.

In “classic” ASP.NET we had the WebPages framework – which allowed us to build sites composed only of views. This was perfect for lightweight projects, where we didn’t need the entire model-controller infrastructure.

At the moment, ASP.NET Core doesn’t have an equivalent yet (though it’s being worked on), but we have already provided a similar type of experience via the WebApiContrib project (you can read more about the project here). With the help of some of the libraries from there, we can build controller-less sites for ASP.NET Core already.

In addition to that, we can combine it with using Markdown tag helpers for content delivery – and it will result in a very cool experience – being able to author ASP.NET Core sites, without controllers, in Markdown. With Razor sprinkled on top of it, to provide dynamic data.

Let’s have a look – more after the jump.

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