Browsing posts in: .net

Using async disposable and async enumerable in frameworks older than .NET Core 3.0

One of the awesome features introduced in .NET Core 3.0 and C# 8.0 are async streams. The feature consists of two parts – async disposable, for async clean up, as well as async enumerable, for async iteration.

Normally, the C# language features are backwards compatible and can be used regardless of the runtime framework being targeted. In this particular case, however, the newly introduced types that are needed for async streams feature to work, such as for example IAsyncDisposable or IAsyncEnumerator<T>, were only added in .NET Core 3.0, restricting the usage of the features to that runtime, and later.

Let's have a look at how you can still benefit from async disposable and async enumerable on older frameworks.

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Reactive Azure Service Bus messaging with Azure Event Grid

Earlier this month, I wrote an article for my friends over at DotNetCurry. They run a free digital magazine called DNC Magazine, that comes out every 2 months, is free to download and to which I occasionally contribute.

The article is entitled "Reactive Azure Service Bus messaging with Azure Event Grid". In the article, I explore Service Bus integration with Azure Event Grid, and the advantages and scenarios it brings to the table. This is a relatively new feature (launched in the fall of 2018) and I already use it extensively in some of my projects, so I wanted to create sort of a general purpose guide on getting started with this, including having a look at some of the potential use cases.

You can subscribe to the magazine (for free) or download single issues (also for free) here – the article can be found in the latest issue May-June 2019.

And of course big thanks to Suprotim and the entire DNC team for their hard work and bringing this magazine to .NET devs for free for 7 years now.


Solution-wide Nuget package version handling with MsBuild 15+

Last year I blogged about a way to handle NuGet package versions at the solution level for .NET SDK-based csproj project files (so those using <PackageReference /> entries to define their NuGet dependencies).

That approach worked reasonably well, but was entirely custom – as it simply relied on defining reusable MsBuild properties to handled the versions, which created a bit of overhead.

With MsBuild 15 and newer, you can actually do it in a much more elegant way. Let’s have a look.

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Easy way to create a C# lambda expression from a string (with Roslyn)

I’ve worked on quite a lot of projects over the years, with many different teams, and one of the questions that keeps coming back to me over and over with a high degree of regularity is how to load a C# lambda from a string – for example from a configuration file.

This is not surprising, because being able to do that can give you a tremendous amount of flexibility in your code, as it would (for the lack of better word) unlock the possibility to alter business logic from the configuration level, without having to recompile and redeploy your application.

Historically, this has been possible but also quite a painful task. Today I wanted to show you a remarkably simple solution to this problem – with the help of the Roslyn compiler Nuget packages.

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Solution-wide Nuget package handling in .NET SDK-based projects

In this blog post I’d like to show you a very simple technique for ensuring all your Nuget packages across all the projects in a solution have the same version. Such package management improvement introduced recently into the OmniSharp code by one and only Dustin Campbell, and I’ve also been using it in some of my projects.

If your solution is built around .NET SDK csproj projects, which were introduced in Visual Studio 2017, hopefully this blog post will be useful to you.

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Announcing ConfigR 1.0

Recently we released version 1.0 of ConfigR – a popular .NET configuration library, that lets you configure your application via C# scripts (CSX).

This is also the last release requiring full .NET 4.5/Mono – the next version of ConfigR is going to be a netstandard.

Here’s a overview of the features that are there in 1.0!

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Strongly typed configuration in ASP.NET Core without IOptions<T>

There are several great resources on the Internet about using the new Configuration and Options framework of ASP.NET Core – like this comprehensive post by Rick Strahl.

Using strongly typed configuration is without a question a great convenience and productivity boost for the developers; but what I wanted to show you today is how to bind IConfiguration directly to your POCO object – so that you can inject it directly into the dependent classes without wrapping into IOptions.

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Customizing FormatFilter behavior in ASP.NET Core MVC 1.0

When you are building HTTP APIs with ASP.NET Core MVC, the framework allows you to use FormatFilter to let the calling client override any content negotiation that might have happened on the server side.

This way, the client can – for example – force the return data to be JSON or CSV or any other format suitable (as long as the server supports it, of course) for his consumption.

The built-in mechanism (out of the box version of FormatFilter) is a little limited, so let’s have a look at how you can extend and customize its behavior.

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